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Sabtu, 11 Juli 2009

Freshwater Fish Species Profiles

continue upload about Freshwater Fish....

130. STARLIGHT BRISTLENOSE PLECO "L183" (Ancistrus dolichopterus)
FAMILY: Loricariidae
TYPE: Catfish
MAX SIZE: 4" (approx. 10cm)
ORIGIN: Brazil, South America
DIET: Omnivorous
CHARACTER: Peaceful
MISC: have been commercially bred eventhough still considered rare in the local market, males have head tentacles, females do not

>>>before transformation
>>>halfway process
>>>after transformation
129. RUBBER PLECO (Parancistrus aurantiacus)
FAMILY: Loricariidae
TYPE: Catfish
MAX SIZE: 8.7" (approx. 22cm)
ORIGIN: Rio Ucuyali, Peru (South America)
DIET: Omnivorous
CHARACTER: Peaceful
MISC: Capable of changing from a dull grey brown colouration into striking golden form, eats most vegetarian foods, tablets and pellets, frozen meaty foods and woods



128. DULL EYED ROYAL PLECO "L191" (Panaque sp.)
FAMILY: Loricariidae
TYPE: Catfish
MAX SIZE: 10" (approx. 25cm)
ORIGIN: Colombia, South America
DIET: Omnivorous, tends to be more herbivorous
CHARACTER: Peaceful
MISC: oftenly referred as "Green Royal", has got grey eye colour instead red / orange like most royal pleco


127. "L236" (Hypancistrus sp.)
FAMILY: Loricariidae
TYPE: Catfish
MAX SIZE: 4.7" (approx. 12cm)
ORIGIN: Rio Iriri, Brazil (South America)
DIET: Omnivorous
CHARACTER: Peaceful
MISC: a very beautiful species rarely seen on stocklists, if you ever come by some, you should jump at the chance without any hesitation!


126. RED LIZARD "L10a" (Rineloricaria sp.)
FAMILY: Loricariidae
TYPE: Catfish
MAX SIZE: 4.4" (approx. 11cm)
ORIGIN: South America
DIET: Omnivorous
CHARACTER: Peaceful
MISC: Aqualog introduced this fish with an l-number of L010a, it is very different from L010, will eat most foods from cucumber or zucchini slices to frozen bloodworm or dry flake foods, have been commercially bred

Arapaima- The World's Megafishes


A diver shares a tank with an adult arapaima fish at an aquarium in Manaus, Brazil. Known as the pirarucu in Brazil and the paiche in Peru, this South America giant is one of the largest freshwater fish in the world. Some reach lengths of more than 10 feet (3 meters) and weigh upward of 400 pounds (180 kilograms). Wow....Awsome fish.

Large megafish like these have become rare worldwide due to heavy fishing. The arapaima is the focus of several conservation projects in South America, including no-fishing reserves and fishing quotas.

You gonna fishing this fish? haha


New Salamander Found -- One of World's Smallest

salamander photo
July 8, 2009—The newly named patch-nosed salamander—the second smallest salamander in the United States—had been living right under our noses.

Scientists found the 2-inch-long (5.1-centimeter-long) amphibian (pictured above) in 2007, in a creek near a well-traveled road in northern Georgia. (See a regional map.)

The new species, named for its lighter hued snout, is so different from other salamanders in the amphibian-rich region that it was placed in a new genus. (Read more on the NatGeo News Watch blog.)

It is the first new genus of a four-footed creature found in the U.S. in 50 years, scientists say.

(See a photo of an "ugly" new salamander found in Ecuador.)

Of the approximately 560 salamanders in the world, 10 percent are found in Georgia's Appalachian Mountains.

Finding a new animal living so close to humans shows that "there are still things out there to discover," team member John Maerz, of the University of Georgia, said in a statement.

"It makes you wonder, what else is out there?"

Research appears in a new issue of the Journal of Zoology.

—Christine Dell'Amore

Photograph courtesy the University of Georgia

Senin, 29 Juni 2009

Komodo National Park Part II



LOCATION :
Komodo National Park lies in the Wallacea Region of Indonesia, identified by WWF and Conservation International as a global conservation priority area. The Park is located between the islands of Sumbawa and Flores at the border of the Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) and Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTP) provinces. It includes three major islands, Komodo, Rinca and Padar, and numerous smaller islands together totaling 603 km2 of land. The total size of Komodo National Park is presently 1,817 km2. Proposed extensions of 25 km2 of land (Banta Island) and 479 km2 of marine waters would bring the total surface area up to 2,321 km2.

HISTORY :
Komodo National Park was established in 1980 and was declared a World Heritage Site and a Man and Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 1986. The park was initially established to conserve the unique Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), first discovered by the scientific world in 1911 by J.K.H. Van Steyn. Since then conservation goals have expanded to protecting its entire biodiversity, both marine and terrestrial. The majority of the people in and around the Park are fishermen originally from Bima (Sumbawa), Manggarai, South Flores, and South Sulawesi. Those from South Sulawesi are from the Suku Bajau or Bugis ethnic groups. The Suku Bajau were originally nomadic and moved from location to location in the region of Sulawesi, Nusa Tenggara and Maluku, to make their livelihoods. Descendents of the original people of Komodo, the Ata Modo, still live in Komodo, but there are no pure blood people left and their culture and language is slowly being integrated with the recent migrants. Little is known of the early history of the Komodo islanders. They were subjects of the Sultanate of Bima, although the island’s remoteness from Bima meant its affairs were probably little troubled by the Sultanate other than by occasional demand for tribute.

TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS :
The terrestrial ecosystems are strongly affected by the climate: a lengthy dry season with high temperatures and low rainfall, and seasonal monsoon rains. The Park is situated in a transition zone between Australian and Asian flora and fauna. Terrestrial ecosystems include open grass-woodland savanna, tropical deciduous (monsoon) forest, and quasi cloud forest. Due to the dry climate, terrestrial plant species richness is relatively low. The majority of terrestrial species are xerophytic and have specific adaptations to help them obtain and retain water. Past fires have selected for species that are fire-adapted, such as some grass species and shrubs. Terrestrial plants found in Komodo National Park include grasses, shrubs, orchids, and trees. Important food tree species for the local fauna include Jatropha curkas, Zizyphus sp., Opuntia sp., Tamarindus indicus, Borassus flabellifer, Sterculia foetida, Ficus sp., Cicus sp., ‘Kedongdong hutan’ (Saruga floribunda), and ‘Kesambi’ (Schleichera oleosa).

TERRESTRIAL FAUNA :
The terrestrial fauna is of rather poor diversity in comparison to the marine fauna. The number of terrestrial animal species found in the Park is not high, but the area is important from a conservation perspective as some species are endemic.. Many of the mammals are Asiatic in origin (e.g., deer, pig, macaques, civet). Several of the reptiles and birds are Australian in origin. These include the orange-footed scrubfowl, the lesser sulpher-crested cockatoo and the nosy friarbird. Reptiles: The most famous of Komodo National Park's reptiles is the Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis). It is among the world's largest reptiles and can reach 3 meters or more in length and weigh over 70kg. To find out more about this fascinating creature click
here. Other than the Komodo Dragon twelve terrestrial snake species are found on the island. including the cobra (Naja naja sputatrix), Russel’s pit viper (Vipera russeli), and the green tree vipers (Trimeresurus albolabris). Lizards include 9 skink species (Scinidae), geckos (Gekkonidae), limbless lizards (Dibamidae), and, of course, the monitor lizards (Varanidae). Frogs include the Asian Bullfrog (Kaloula baleata), Oreophyne jeffersoniana and Oreophyne darewskyi. They are typically found at higher, moister altitudes. Mammals: Mammals include the Timor deer (Cervus timorensis), the main prey of the Komodo dragon, horses (Equus sp.), water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), wild boar (Sus scrofa vittatus), long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus lehmanni), the endemic Rinca rat (Rattus rintjanus), and fruit bats. One can also find goats, dogs and domestic cats.
Birds: One of the main bird species is the orange-footed scrub fowl (Megapodius reinwardti), a ground dwelling bird. In areas of savanna, 27 species were observed. Geopelia striata and Streptopelia chinensis were the most common species. In mixed deciduous habitat, 28 bird species were observed, and Philemon buceroides, Ducula aenea, and Zosterops chloris were the most common.


MARINE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT :
The marine area constitutes 67% of the Park. The open waters in the Park are between 100 and 200 m deep. The straits between Rinca and Flores and between Padar and Rinca, are relatively shallow (30 to 70 m deep), with strong tidal currents. The combination of strong currents, coral reefs and islets make navigation around the islands in Komodo National Park difficult and dangerous. Sheltered deep anchorage is available at the bay of Loh Liang on Komodo’s east coast, the South East coast of Padar, and the bays of Loh Kima and Loh Dasami on Rinca. In the North of the Park water temperature ranges between 25 – 29°C. In the middle, the temperature ranges between 24 and 28°C. The temperatures are lowest in the South, ranging from 22 – 28°C. Water salinity is about 34 ppt and the water is quite clear, although the waters closer to the islands are relatively more turbid.

MARINE ECOSYSTEMS :
Indonesia is the only equatorial region in the world where there is an exchange of marine flora and fauna between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Passages in Nusa Tenggara (formerly the Lesser Sunda Islands) between the Sunda and Sahul shelves allow movement between the Pacific and Indian oceans. The three main ecosystems in Komodo National Park are seagrass beds, coral reefs, and mangrove forests. The Park is probably a regular cetacean migration route.

MARINE FLORA :
The three major coastal marine plants are algae, seagrasses and mangrove trees. Algae are primitive plants, which do not have true roots, leaves or stems. An important reef-building algae is the red coralline algae, which actually secretes a hard limestone skeleton that can encrust and cement dead coral together. Seagrasses are modern plants that produce flowers, fruits and seeds for reproduction. As their name suggests, they generally look like large blades of grass growing underwater in sand near the shore. Thallasia sp. and Zastera spp. are the common species found in the Park. Mangroves trees can live in salty soil or water, and are found throughout the Park. An assessment of mangrove resources identified at least 19 species of true mangroves and several more species of mangrove associates within the Park's borders.

MARINE FAUNA :
Komodo National Park includes one of the world's richest marine environments. It consists of forams, cnidaria (includes over 260 species of reef building coral), sponges (70 species), ascidians, marine worms, mollusks, echinoderms, crustaceans, cartilaginous and bony fishes (over 1,000 species), marine reptiles, and marine mammals (dolphins, whales, and dugongs). Some notable species with high commercial value include sea cucumbers (Holothuria), Napoleon wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus), and groupers.

With this information, people can know how that komodo national park is interesting because the park can save many of knowledge of the world.

Save our heritage,
Vote
Komodo National Park to become the New 7 Wonders of Nature by voting through the following the URL:
http://www.new7wonders.com/nature/en/liveranking/

Komodo National Park


Komodo National Park is most amazing animals park in the world, which is living fossil. The name of living fossil is Komodo as " The Dragon" where living in Komodo National Park. Komodo National Park lies in the Wallacea Region of Indonesia, identified by WWF and Conservation International as a global conservation priority area. The Park is located between the islands of Sumbawa and Flores at the border of the Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) and Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTP) provinces. It includes three major islands, Komodo, Rinca and Padar, and numerous smaller islands together totaling 603 km2 of land. The total size of Komodo National Park is presently 1,817 km2. Proposed extensions of 25 km2 of land (Banta Island) and 479 km2 of marine waters would bring the total surface area up to 2,321 km2.

Komodo National Park was established in 1980 and was declared a World Heritage Site and a Man and Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO in 1986. The park was initially established to conserve the unique Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), first discovered by the scientific world in 1911 by J.K.H. Van Steyn. Since then conservation goals have expanded to protecting its entire biodiversity, both marine and terrestrial.

Komodo National Park is currently among three destination in Indonesia that has been qualified in the New 7 Wonders of Nature campaign held by the New 7 Wonders Foundation (two other candidates is Lake Toaba and Krakatau Island). You may support Komodo National Park to become the New 7 Wonders of Nature by voting through the following the URL:

http://www.new7wonders.com/nature/en/liveranking/

Komodo National Park Rank is 6 ( 29/06/2009)

Vote Komodo National Park to become the New 7 Wonders of Nature